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reliable information on credit cards - online investing - personal loans - owning and operating your own home business. indepth information from professionals in their field. dont forget to check out our links to the best sources on the internet, these days information and research is critical to making the best educated decision to suit your needs.

Saturday, June 17, 2006

How to get the best Credit Card Deals!



So you took advantage of one of those credit repair credit cards with higher interest rates to help you repair your credit?

Or perhaps you missed a payment or two a while back and are now saddled with a fairly large balance on a high interest credit card. Maybe it was your first credit card, and you're still paying the interest rate offered to those with no status credit. No matter what the reason, you've got a credit card balance on which you're paying interest rates higher than average, and you'd like to cut those monthly payments. Welcome to the world of balance transfer credit cards.

Balance transfer credit cards are credit cards that offer a special interest rate on accounts transferred from another credit card. Essentially, when you take advantage of balance transfer credit cards, you're borrowing money on your new credit card to pay off the balance on your old (higher interest) credit card, then repaying the new credit card company at a lower rate of interest. 0% balance transfer rates have been a popular incentive for credit card companies to attract business for the past several years.

Lately, though, many credit card companies have found that offering 0% balance transfers is a losing proposition for them as customers play credit card shuffle, moving their account balances from one card to another whenever the 0% interest rate ends. In order to combat that practice, credit card companies are getting more creative with their balance transfer credit cards. That's why it's important to compare balance transfer credit cards to be sure you're getting the best possible deal - or at least one that actually will save you money in the long run.

Here are some things to watch for when comparing balance transfer credit cards:

How long does the introductory balance transfer rate last?

The 0% balance transfer interest rate is usually an introductory rate. As long as you pay off the entire balance within the introductory period - usually six to nine months - you pay no interest at all on the amount that you've transferred.

How much is the balance transfer fee?

Often, there's a charge for transferring your balance from one card to another. Be sure to include that fee in your costs when you compare balance transfer credit cards.

What is the interest rate AFTER the introductory period ends?

The introductory rate will end eventually. How much will you be paying in interest after it ends? Will that apply to the entire balance, or just the amount left on your transferred balance?

Are there other restrictions?

The newer balance transfer credit cards offer other incentives than 0% interest rates on your transferred balance, or may include restrictions to how long the balance must remain on the card. Many of the new balance transfer credit cards offer an interest free second year, or a one-month free payment rather than a 0% transfer fee as a way to get around the credit card balance shufflers. When you compare balance transfer credit cards, be sure to make a note of any restrictions on the balance transfer offers.

So you can see it's important to compare balance transfer credit cards to check the best deal. At www.moneyeverything.com/cards you'll find all the latest no interest balance transfer credit cards, along with details so that you can compare balance transfer credit cards to be sure you're getting a deal that will save you money.

-->by: Jon Francis

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Credit Score, Exactly what is it and how do you determine it?



Credit history have you confused? Every one puts such a huge importance on your credit score. Why is this credit score so important? And how is it determined?

Your credit score is based on multiple variables that are dependent on your credit and amount of money loaned out to you. Your credit, or more appropriately addressed as the ability for you to pay back the money that has been loaned to you, whether it be through a credit card, mortgage, home equity loan, car, RV, boat, motorcycle, rental apartment or town home, or just about anything that involves you paying back money trustingly for the items you have purchased or pay for on a monthly basis.

When your credit score is accumulated, each item is passed through a system where points are either awarded or deducted based on the status of the terms. For example, if you have a specific amount in a loan, and you are paying consistently and on time, then you will be awarded points. However, if you are late on payments, and have many credit cards close to maximum, perhaps have not made every house, car, or RV payment, on time, then you will be deducted points.

The computer program evaluates the awarded points and deducted points to come to a total. This total can range from around 330 to the lower 800's. This score is used to evaluate if you can make your payments and on time.

There is usually a clear relationship between those with a higher score and those with a lower score. Those people with a higher score, above about 680 are capable of paying back the loans that they take out. However, those who have a score below 680 are less capable of paying back their debts on time.

Lenders use this information to determine the terms of your mortgage when buying a home. I f your credit score is up to par, you can expect a lower interest rate, shorter terms, and less fees. However, if your credit score is below the average, then you can expect to have a higher interest rate, more fees, and possibly more expenses that are associated with the lender taking a greater risk with a person that may not be capable to pay back the mortgage in a timely basis.

So as a result, your credit score is a huge influence in the mortgage terms that you can qualify for. Because of this, you should try to clean up your credit score to the best of your ability. This means paying back loans, paying on time, and closing out any credit cards that are not necessary in your financial situation.

There are many things that actually affect your credit score. Keep in mind that if you pay on time and are on top of the debt that you have, having some debt and credit is a beneficial thing. If you can prove that you can handle debt, and pay on time and towards the principal amount, then you will not have as many problems.

If you have too many delinquencies, a short credit history, too many revolving accounts, too few revolving accounts, balances that are close to maximum, too many accounts, and of course major problems such as tax liens, judgments and bankruptcies, then you can expect your credit score to be lower than average.

In order to repair these credit issue to get the mortgage rate that you deserve, be sure to handle any debts or payments that might deduct points from your score. Pay above the minimum, on time, and you will quickly see your credit score increase as the problems are depleted.

The basics for having a decent credit score is to not have too much debt, pay your debt on time, and not have too high of interest rates! If you feel you need to correct some issues on your credit score, then do it! You can end up saving thousands of dollars! Do not buy a home until you are financially stable and capable of maintaining a house. You do not want to take on something that you can not handle financially.

-->by: John R. Blakefield

Other Links:



Structured Settlement Annuity

progressive slot

cardcreditdebtreduction

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